Clarkson College’s New 3D Printing Lab and Training Center Aims to Change Medical Imaging

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If you’ve ever needed medical intervention, you may have felt confused when your doctor told you exactly what will be done. A new 3D printing and training center at Clarkson College hopes to turn that confusion into knowledge. And this kind of technology is especially special for Clarkson’s program administrator. “In February, my 10-month-old son was diagnosed with choroid plexus papilloma, a brain tumor in the third ventricle of his brain,” Blair Kauzlarich said. Kauzlarich obtained a copy of her son’s CT and MRI scans from medical records. Then she teamed up with a radiologist to create a 3D version of Callum’s brain. “3D printing has really become the language of healthcare,” she said. Clarkson Colege’s print lab can print a variety of different parts of human anatomy. “Sometimes patients don’t understand medical imaging. You’re looking at a black and white image, you’re scrolling, you’re looking at it in all the different views, maybe you don’t understand what you’re looking at,” said Kauzlarich. But Kauzlarich said seeing a medical condition in its physical form can be extremely helpful for patients and doctors. “It’s definitely used for patient care to better understand what diagnosis they have and what they’re going to go through,” she said. Callum’s tumor was ultimately not cancerous. But Blair says knowing exactly where he was helped her decide which method of surgery would be best. “My husband and I were on the same page then when it came to making medical decisions for our son because we both knew what we were dealing with,” Kauzlarich said. It was an experience that pushed her to make more people aware of 3D printing. . “I’m in a unique situation where it’s my job but also I lived it,” she said. “He should be available for anyone who needs to experience something like we did with our son.”

If you’ve ever needed medical intervention, you may have felt confused when your doctor told you exactly what will be done. A new 3D printing and training center at Clarkson College hopes to turn that confusion into knowledge.

And this kind of technology is especially special for Clarkson’s program administrator.

“In February, my 10-month-old son was diagnosed with choroid plexus papilloma, a brain tumor in the third ventricle of his brain,” Blair Kauzlarich said.

Kauzlarich obtained a copy of her son’s CT and MRI scans from medical records. Then she teamed up with a radiologist to create a 3D version of Callum’s brain.

“3D printing has really become the language of healthcare,” she said.

Clarkson Colege’s print lab can print a variety of different parts of human anatomy.

“Sometimes patients don’t understand medical imaging. You’re looking at a black and white image, you’re scrolling, you’re looking at it in all the different views, maybe you don’t understand what you’re looking at,” said Kauzlarich.

But Kauzlarich said seeing a medical condition in its physical form can be incredibly helpful for both patients and doctors.

“It’s definitely used for patient care to better understand what diagnosis they have and what they’re going to go through,” she said.

Callum’s tumor ended up not being cancerous. But Blair says knowing exactly where he was helped her decide which method of surgery would be best.

“My husband and I were on the same page then when it came to making medical decisions for our son because we both knew what we were dealing with,” Kauzlarich said.

It was an experience that pushed her to make people more aware of 3D printing.

“I’m in a unique situation where it’s my job but also I lived it,” she said. “He should be available for anyone who needs to experience something like we did with our son.”


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